James Aitcheson

Currently writing (very well) about the period after 1066 and the Norman Conquest – from a Norman’s point of view.

He’s a new young writer of tremendous promise. So new in-fact, his books haven’t even got their own series name yet!

Well, maybe ‘The Bloody Aftermath of 1066’, but it’s not all that catchy, is it? If i were still an advertising man, I’d have a go at a new one. But I’m not. Any more.

But wait! Amazon are now calling it The Conquest Series, how’s that?

Books:
Sworn Sword
January 1069. Less than three years have passed since Hastings and the death of the usurper, Harold Godwineson. In the depths of winter, two thousand Normans march to subdue the troublesome province of Northumbria. Tancred a Dinant, an ambitious and oath-sworn knight and a proud leader of men, is among them, hungry for battle, for silver and for land. But at Durham the Normans are ambushed in the streets by English rebels. In the battle that ensues, their army is slaughtered almost to a man. Badly wounded, Tancred barely escapes with his life. His lord is among those slain. Soon the enemy are on the march, led by the dispossessed prince Eadgar, the last of the ancient Saxon line, who is determined to seize the realm he believes is his. Yet even as Tancred seeks vengeance for his lord’s murder, he finds himself caught up in secret dealings between a powerful Norman magnate and a shadow from the past. As the Norman and English armies prepare to clash, Tancred begins to uncover a plot which harks back to the day of Hastings itself. A plot which, if allowed to succeed, threatens to undermine the entire Conquest. The fate of the Kingdom hangs in the balance …

My review

The Splintered Kingdom
The story begins on the Welsh Marches, where Tancred has been given land by his new lord, Robert Malet, in return for his services in the battle for York. Now a lord in his own right, he has knights of his own to command and a manor to call home. But all is far from peaceful. The Welsh are joining forces with the English against the Normans and when skirmishes turn into a full scale battle at Shrewsbury, Tancred is betrayed by a rival border lord and taken prisoner by the Welsh. Meanwhile the woman he loves is taken hostage by enemy English forces and the Vikings invade the east coast. Never has Tancred faced a more impossible situation.

My review

Knights of the HawkKnights of the Hawk
Autumn 1071.
The struggle for England has been long and brutal. Now, however, five years after the fateful Battle of Hastings, only a determined band of rebels in the Fens stand between King William and absolute conquest. Tancred, a proud and ambitious knight, is among the Normans marching to crush them. Once lauded for his exploits, his fame is now fading. Embittered by his dwindling fortunes and by the oath shackling him to his lord, he yearns for the chance to win back his reputation through the spilling of enemy blood. But as the Normans’ attempt to assault the rebels’ island stronghold meet with failure, the King grows increasingly desperate. With morale in camp failing and the prospect of victory seeming ever more distant, Tancred’s loyalty is put to the test as never before.
Knights of the Hawk is the third novel in the compelling Conquest series (1066: The Bloody Aftermath) from the author of Sworn Sword.

My Review


The HarrowingThe Harrowing
In the aftermath of 1066, a Norman army marches through the North of England: burning, killing and laying waste to everything in its path. The Harrowing has begun.
As towns and villages fall to the invaders, five travellers are forced to nad together for survival. Refugees in their own country, they journey through the wasteland, hoping to find sanctuary with the last stand of the Saxon rebellion. But are they fleeing the Normans or their own troubles?
Priest, Lady, Servant, Minstrel: each has their own story; each with their own sin.
As enemies past and present close in, their prior deeds catch up with them and they discover there is no sanctuary from fate.

My review

James’ biography from dust jackets:
James Aitcheson was born in Wiltshire and read History at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where began his fascination with the medieval period and the Norman Conquest in particular.

Not very much, eh? Still, he is only young…

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